lojbo jufsisku
Lojban sentence search

Total: 1711 result(s)
djuno
gismu rafsi: jun ju'o x1 knows fact(s) x2 (du'u) about subject x3 by epistemology x4. Words usable for epistemology typically have a du'u place; know how to - implying knowledge of method but not necessarily having the ability to practice (= tadjyju'o). (cf. know/familiar with: se slabu, na'e cnino, na'e fange). See also cmavo list du'o, krici, jinvi, cilre, certu, facki, jijnu, jimpe, senpi, smadi, kakne, birti, mipri, morji, saske, viska.
fau'au
experimental cmavo two-tier function map/assignment writer notation: X1 (ordered list, no repetitious terms) maps termwise-respectively to X2 (ordered list; may be repetitious but must have exactly as many terms as X1) So named because, in mathematical notation, the domain set of the function is written down in some order in its entirety and then, below it, the range of the function is written so that each image and preimage line up vertically with their appropriate/respective partner. Really useful when mapping from a countable set/object that is either human-small or in which the pattern is clear. Occasionally used for a more explicit form of notation for permutations (in which cycle decomposition is not necessarily as evident, but the structure as a how is, at least, explicit). The ith term of X1 is mapped to the ith term of X2; there is no knowledge of what happens to any value that is not term of list X1. Useful for lambda calculus.
ge'ei
experimental cmavo metasyntactic variable marker Explicitly marks the preceding variable, e.g. ko'a ko'e, lerfu-strings, and/or broda series as being metasyntactic: i.e. having no specific meaning or referent and merely used to demonstrate syntax or hypothetical scenarios. Automatically unassigns the variable from any previous assignment. May also be used for pronouns like mi or do or dei. This is useful to refer to mi as a 'first-person pronoun' rather than the actual speaker themself, for example, when giving the definition of mi'o: 'mi ge'ei jo'u do ge'ei', makes it clear that the speaker doesn't literally mean the speaker and the listener, but are using mi and do metasyntactically. Similarly, one might define mi as 'lo cusku be dei ge'ei'. See ge'ai, da'o
gu'au'i
experimental cmavo mekso operator, variable arity - algebraic structure order of X1; OR: order of/(size of) period of element X1 in algebraic structure X2 under operator/of type X3 If applied to an algebraic structure (such as a group) it gives the order thereof (which, for a group, is the cardinality of the underlying set). If applied to an element of an algebraic structure, one has the options to specify the structure in which its order is being considered and/or the operator with respect to which its order is being considered (for example, in a given ring, an elements additive order is usually not its multiplicative order), although either of these made remain vague and be inferred from context; order is the smallest non-negative number of applications of the operator needed to be applied (in composition) to the original element in order for it to result in the identity element of the structure (thus, order is not always finite or even defined). See also: mau'au, cu'a.
ja'oi
experimental cmavo permutation cycle writer notation start Basically like jo'i, but for cycles. Use boi in order to separate terms. Terminated by tei'u. In this notation, each term maps to the the subsequent term as read from left to right or heard in chronological order of utterance; the last term (immediately before tei'u) maps to the first term. The object constructed is a cyclic permutation, a group element. The singleton cycle is identity on that term. It can be applied to a single element among its terms or may left group act upon a set or structure, or an element if the application is not directly upon it (such as when the application is to an index or variable of that element). Permutations are composed when viewed from outside of their group structure and have the group operator act upon them when within that context. The transposition (1 2) is expressed as ' li ja'oi pa boi re tei'u '. See also: tei'u, ma'o'e, gu'ai, ru'ei, fa'ai.
jitro
gismu rafsi: tro x1 has control over/harnesses/manages/directs/conducts x2 in x3 (activity/event/performance). x2 are aspects/individuals controlled within activity/event x3; manage (= selzuktro, selzukfu'e, gu'etro, gunfu'e, xaktro, xakfu'e) (as distinct from manager/boss = gunterbe'e, gunja'a, gunmi'e, gunca'i). (cf. cmavo list ji'o, bapli, te bende, gidva - which does not necessarily control or command, jatna, macnu, minde, ponse, ralju, rinka, sazri, turni, vlipa, xance, xlura)
kei'au
experimental cmavo mekso operator: finite result set derived from/on set A with/due to operator/function B under ordering of application C Equivalent to: lo'i li zy du ca'e li pe'o se'au mau'au B zai'ai vei ma'o xy boi ny ve'o boi tau sy boi C ku poi ke'a cmaci xanri zi'e poi ke'a mleca li ci'i zo'u tau sy klesi A. Acts on an operator/function (b) and produces all finite results of that operator being used on any allowable number of elements of the set A without repetition within any given application. The result must be defined (and finite, obviously). Application of the operator on nothing (the elements of the empty set) is generically allowed and follows convention (for example, an empty sum may evaluate to 0). Differs from kei'ai. Use mau'au and zai'ai for quoting B. C will be specified explicitly (possibly elsewhere) and/or via zoi'ai.
le'ai
experimental cmavo replace recent mistakenly uttered text The lo'ai ... sa'ai ... le'ai replacement construct asks the listener to replace the text after lo'ai with the text after sa'ai. The order sa'ai ... lo'ai ... le'ai is also allowed, and either or both parts can be omitted and thus left up to context. When both parts are omitted, the word le'ai on its own indicates that a mistake was made while leaving all the details up to context. It is also possible to attach SAI to a le'ai construct: le'ai dai (or le'ai da'oi ko'a) indicates that someone else made a mistake; le'ai pei asks whether someone else made a mistake; and sai, ru'e and cu'i can be used to indicate the importance of the substitution. Furthermore, le'ai nai can be used to explicitly deny mistakes instead of acknowledging them (compare "sic").
lu'ei
experimental cmavo convert a grammatical quotation to a tanru unit; x1 expresses/says the quoted text for audience x2 via expressive medium x3. The terminator is li'au. It is neither grammatical nor logical that a fragment and a sentence are connected by a sentence conjunction like ``.i je'' or ``.i ba bo''. However, such an expression is common among non-Lojban texts. Selma'o lu'ei forms a tanru unit, and helps us to translate such an expression without losing logical aspect of Lojban. It is also useful in writing scenarios. See also li'au, lu and me. Example 1: lu'ei ki'u lo nu la'e di'u na se tarti mi'a noi cinfo ku'o lo tamsmi sei spuda li'au .i ba bo la cinfo fau lo nu banli plipe cu cecla vofli pagre lo vacri gi'e snura zvabi'o lo ragve (cited and modified from ``lo se manci te makfa pe la .oz.'' translated by la selpa'i.) Example 2: ko'a lu'ei u'i doi .maman. ko viska .i ta dasni cizra li'au i ko'e lu'ei .oi ko na degja'o .i ko smaji li'au
noi'a
experimental cmavo PA incidental relative clause; attaches to a PA number/numeral/digit with the ke'a referring to that PA number/numeral/digit. It attaches to the last mentioned PA, which can be only a single digit within a number rather than the entire number itself (if it has digit length greater than one in some base). Thus, beware of grouping. Confer: poi'a, jau'au. The attachment of this word to the immediately preceding word can be ovverriden by the usage of xe'au, which begins bracketing together an utterance/subexpression that will be considered to be the single and whole referent of the clause introduced by this word, wthe utterance of which also finishes the bracket. There is a proposal to expand the attachment of this word to any word spoken in a mekso utterance (rather than only members of selma'o PA), including members of selma'o VUhU, etc.
pecai
cmavo-compound restrictive relative phrase marker: permanently / inalienably associated with; it is impossible or near-impossible to break that relation Proposed as a variation of po'e with less semantic-boundary difficulties, while freeing up po'e for reassignment in dialects/forks. Most words that the concept of 'inalienable possession' applies to, e.g. birka, mamta, or even pendo in some natlangs, have a convenient be place to be used instead with a better-defined meaning. However, this may be used for any relation that is impossible-or-nigh-impossible to break, e.g. the car you worked on and made custom modifications to for years; in a sense, it will still be "your car" even if you sold it. do'ecai could be a variation to associate a bridi or the subject of the bridi, e.g. 'ti karce do'ecai mi'. See also pesai, pe
poi'a
experimental cmavo PA restrictive relative clause; attaches to a PA number/numeral/digit with the ke'a referring to that PA number/numeral/digit. It attaches to the last mentioned PA, which can be only a single digit within a number rather than the entire number itself (if it has digit length greater than one in some base). Thus, beware of grouping. Confer: noi'a, jau'au. The attachment of this word to the immediately preceding word can be ovverriden by the usage of xe'au, which begins bracketing together an utterance/subexpression that will be considered to be the single and whole referent of the clause introduced by this word, wthe utterance of which also finishes the bracket. There is a proposal to expand the attachment of this word to any word spoken in a mekso utterance (rather than only members of selma'o PA), including members of selma'o VUhU, etc.
traji
gismu rafsi: rai x1 is superlative in property x2 (ka), the x3 extreme (ka; default ka zmadu) among set/range x4. Also: x1 is x3-est/utmost in x2 among x4; x1 is the x3 end of x4; x1 is extreme; x1 is simply x3. (cf. cmavo list rai, jimte, milxe, mutce, note contrast with milxe and mutce rather than with mleca and zmadu, which are values for x3, banli, curve, fanmo, krasi, manfo, prane)
xau'e'o
experimental cmavo mekso convention default specification/definition (explicit) This word is followed by a list of rules. The rules specify the convention by which mekso or mathematical expressions (of various kinds) are to be interpreted. Such conventions are taken to remain in effect until the end of the discourse, until repealed, or if the come to conflict with subsequent rules so marked; in the lattermost case, the subsequent rule takes precedent and the earlier rules that are in conflict with it are ignored only in the most minimal domain of application possible (for example, a rule saying "left composition of functions is denoted by "°" in all cases" could be followed by a rule saying "when a linear transformation can be represented by a matrix, left composition of two such functions is equivalent to left multiplication of their corresponding matrices and so their left composition may be represented simply by juxtaposition as is typical with/for multiplication" with result being that "°" is to be used for all left compositions of functions except when both functions being composed are linear transformations admitting matrix representations, in which case "°" could be used but adjacency alone is sufficient to denote their left composition). Collections of rules (ordered in increasing precedence) can be named and referenced by such name expressed instead of those rules at length (such as calling a (specific) rather simple set of rules defining the order of operations ".pemas."). See also: xau'o'o.
xau'o'o
experimental cmavo mekso convention cancellation This word is followed by an evaluated li clause (yielding specifically a number n, which probably is a non-negative integer, or a set thereof (the elements of which will also be denoted by simply n, for simplicity) ). It repeals the nth most recent/last convention (counting backward) for mekso/mathematical expressions defined by xau'e'o. In order to repeal all such conventions (returning to the conventions specified by some grammar collection), the set should include all integers less than or equal to some sufficiently large integer (which might be ro); ro denotes the first rule defined (the last rule counting backward from the most recent)- it does not reference "all rules defined"; the most recent rule is denoted by pa. Any named body/ordered collection of rules (such as ".pemas.") is treated as being only one rule for the purposes of such counting.
zoi'ai
experimental cmavo non-mekso quote/name substitution for ordered collection of prescriptions, descriptions, definitions, etc. Delimited non-math/non-mekso quote (works like zoi in this respect). Treats the quote as a substitute for some formal collection of rules or mathematical description/definitions/notations; the exact meaning of the quote must be inferred as is the case with la or any quote; the quote is treated as a single block of text representative a single entity so described in only that case/context by the utterer; can be used to clarify the interpretation of text (convention specification; text need not be mathematical (in which case, it must be used in a meta-linguistic scope)) or as an operand of certain mathematical operators (or, more generally perhaps, bridi). Might be useful for quoting names as descriptors for arguments of operands. For example: orderings, metrics, bases, densities, analytic properties, conventions, etc. can all be more easily described by a moniker than by a formal mathematical description. See also: ju'au, se'au, mau'au.