lojbo jufsisku
Lojban sentence search

Total: 2585 result(s)
xe'e
experimental cmavo digit/number: any/non-specific referent; modifies quantifier to indicate that it is not important what the specific members of the referential set are Note: ro is preferred if you are merely saying that the predicate is true for all referents ("Anyone can do this"), rather than saying something like "Choose any two apples". // (xe'e pa prenu) = "any one person / one non-specific person", (xe'enai pa prenu) = "one specific person". See itca, steci, su'anai, su'ero, te'i'o
dau'a
experimental cmavo gafyzmico: Reset all default specifications of immediately previous word to official definition specifications hereinafter (permanently) Restores all default specifications in the (terbri) structure of immediately previously uttered word so that implicit/omitted zo'e and di'au that may fill the terbri of that word are predefined/specific in reference and do indeed necessarily agree with the default setting explicitly specified in the discourse-external/“official” definition of the word. The terbri are not filled by this word. Usage is only meaningful for a brivla with at least one terbri (regardless of being explicitly filled or otherwise). In a tanru or other complicated construct, only the most recent word undergoes this terbri default restoration (not every term in the construct). A selbri converted to a sumti by gadri has the x1 terbri filled for the purposes of this word, but the default setting of that terbri is so restored all the same; likewise is the case for terbri accessed by be or bei; seltau in the main level of a sumti are filled by the gadri as well for the purposes of this word. Affects all future uses of the word (permanent), until the end of the text/conversation or explicitly undone in some manner. See also: doi'a, de'au, zmico.
de'au
experimental cmavo gafyzmico: Cancellation (permanent) of all defaults in immediately previous word Cancels/overrides/ignores/"kills" all defaults (default specifications) in the (terbri) structure of immediately previously uttered word so that implicit/omitted zo'e and di'au that may fill the terbri of that word are general in potential reference (modulo context) and do not necessarily agree with the default setting explicitly specified in the discourse-exterior/“official” definition of the word. The terbri are not filled by this word. Usage is only meaningful for a brivla with at least one terbri (regardless of being explicitly filled or otherwise). In a tanru or other complicated construct, only the most recent word undergoes this terbri default override (not every term in the construct). A selbri converted to a sumti by gadri has the x1 terbri filled for the purposes of this word, but the default setting of that terbri is so overridden all the same; likewise is the case for terbri accessed by be or bei; seltau in the main level of a sumti are filled by the gadri as well for the purposes of this word. Affects all future uses of the word (permanent), until the end of the text/conversation or explicitly undone in some manner. See also: dau'a, de'oi, zmico.
xulta
experimental gismu x1 is beyond/beside/abstract/meta (older sense) to x2 so as to be an abstraction thereof/external thereto, being so beyond/abstract in property/aspect x3, and having features x4, governed by/considered in system/considerations/epistemology/theory x5; x1 is conceptually beyond/external to/higher up than x2 (in, for example, existential or consideration precedence) x1 need not be an abstraction *of* x2, but must be abstract *to* it. The word "metaphysics" could be translated with/using this word. All meta things (in the sense of cmeta) are necessarily xulta, but the converse is not true; may also include all things that are sucta. This word is different from sucta in that no concept or properties need to be generalized/simplified/idealized/abstracted from x2 in order to produce x1 (by some rules); x1 is just an object/concept/system/etc. that exists beyond/external to x2 (in some "higher plane", so to speak). Do not confuse with: xutla. Proposed short rafsi: -xut-. See also: cmeta, sucta.
de'oi
experimental cmavo Cancellation (instant-/usage-wise; temporary) of all defaults in immediately previous word Cancels/overrides/ignores/"kills" all defaults (default specifications) in the (terbri) structure of immediately previously uttered word so that implicit/omitted zo'e and{di’au} that may fill the terbri of that word are general in potential reference (modulo context) and do not necessarily agree with the default setting explicitly specified in the discourse-external/“official” definition of the word. The terbri are not filled by this word. Usage is only meaningful for a brivla with at least one terbri (regardless of being explicitly filled or otherwise). In a tanru or other complicated construct, only the most recent word undergoes this terbri default override (not every term in the construct). A selbri converted to a sumti by gadri has the x1 terbri filled for the purposes of this word, but the default setting of that terbri is so overridden all the same; likewise is the case for terbri accessed by be or bei; seltau in the main level of a sumti are filled by the gadri as well for the purposes of this word. The cancellation is only effective for the single occurrence/instant/usage of this word (the next use of the affected word will be implicitly accompanied by its terbri defaults, as defined elsewhere (by official definition or by other (permanent) modifications made to the word)). See also: doi'a, de'au, zmico.
doi'a
experimental cmavo gafyzmico: Reset all default specification of the immediately previous word to their respective discourse-external/official definition specifications for this instance/usage only. Resets all defaults (default specifications) in the (terbri) structure of immediately previously uttered word so that implicit/omitted zo'e and di'au that may fill the terbri of that word are predefined/specific in reference and do indeed necessarily agree with the default setting explicitly specified in the discourse-exterior/”official” definition of the word. The terbri are not filled by this word. Usage is only meaningful for a brivla with at least one terbri (regardless of being explicitly filled or otherwise). In a tanru or other complicated construct, only the most recent word undergoes this terbri default restoration (not every term in the construct). A selbri converted to a sumti by gadri has the x1 terbri filled for the purposes of this word, but the default setting of that terbri is so restored all the same; likewise is the case for terbri accessed by be or bei; seltau in the main level of a sumti are filled by the gadri as well for the purposes of this word. The restoration is only effective for the single occurrence/instant/usage of this word (the next use of the affected word will be implicitly accompanied by its terbri defaults, as defined elsewhere (by official definition or by other (permanent) modifications made to the word)). See also: dau'a, de'oi, zmico
tai'e'i
experimental cmavo mekso unary operator: basic Schlafli symbol composer (defined only on ordered lists) Given an ordered (typically finite) list (which is a single object) of zero or more (probably nonnegative) rational numbers, L = (X_1, X_2, ..., X_n). This word composes them in order into a Schlafli symbol S(L) with these entries exactly and without any entries that do not appear in the list so as to produce an (n-1)-dimensional regular polytope. For example: L = () implies that S(L) = S(()) is a line segment. Where L = (6), S(L) = S((6)) is a regular convex hexagon; generally, for integer X_1 > 2, S((X_1)) is a proper convex regular (X_1)-gon. S((X_1, X_2) is a proper convex regular polyhedron with polygonal faces being all of form S((X_1)) such that they are arranged with X_2 touching at each vertex of the polyhedron. Star polytopes and tessellations are supported. More general notation such as Schlafli symbols prefixed by a letter/acted upon by a function, which are affixed with/multiplied by a number or other symbols, which contain "|", etc. are not presently supported in this definition; only the most basic/classic Schlafli symbols (those composed of a single pair of curly braces containing rational numbers separated only by commas, and nothing else) are presently supported. Certain operators (such as "half", "alter", etc., as well as Cartesian product, "add"/"plus", and "join", and affixation of other numbers or symbols) have somewhat special definitions on Schlafli symbols; they are presently not supported in Lojban (but this will hopefully soon change). Not all ordered lists will produce good output. See also: tarmrclefli
zei'ei
experimental cmavo begin quote that is converted into rafsi Terminated by zei'oi. Quotes an utterance (must be grammatical) and converts it (as a whole) into a single rafsi with the meaning of "something to do with the referent of "[insert quoted text]"". Notably, does not distribute through the text, treating each word individually with left-grouping (it does not distribute zei before and/or after each word (as needed)); the quoted utterance is taken as a whole unit of meaning unto itself; for the former purpose, see zei'ei'au. This word is useful for forming quotes and mathematical expressions (formal, evaluated, or otherwise) into lujvo. This rafsi is assumed to begin the next word if the preceding text/utterance does not end with an otherwise standalone and ungrammatical rafsi (the grammar in such a situation should be discussed); in order to connect it as a rafsi within a lujvo that began before it, precede the quotation with zei. In order to finish a lujvo or treat the quotation as a brivla on its own, follow it with co'e, which is treated as if the preceding utterance (the quote) is a single word followed immediately by zei; in order to string multiple ZEIhEI-ZEIhOI rafsi together follow this formula: zei'ei broda zei'oi co'e zei zei'ei brode zei'oi (co'e (zei...))... . Individual rafsi outside of lujvo are typically not grammatical (except in certain quotation structures, vel sim.).
ju'u'i
experimental cmavo long-digit interpretation specifier; macrodigit named base specifier When a string of multiple digits is on either side of pi'e, the string is to be interpreted as a single "macrodigit" in the longer numeric string; let the digits that compose it be called "microdigits" for clarity. By default, the macrodigit is interpreted as being written/expressed in some cultural or grammatical default (this default is overridden by ju'au if its specifying sumti requires an alternative interpretation for the value of the macrodigits), probably decimal- the interpretation of the string of microdigits produces a number, x; the "pi'e" implies the denominator to be used in determining the fraction for which x is in the numerator and context or possibly a specified base determines its value- in timekeeping, the interpretation is typically x/60 for certain macrodigits. However, the default for determining the value of x given a string of microdigits might be useful to override (for example, Tsohnai uses an overall factorial base but each macrodigit is written in balanced quinary); this word specifies the base used for interpreting the macrodigit from a string of microdigits. It is placed at the end of the string (possibly before the next "pi'e") and its scope of effect extends from there, through the string of microdigits, to either the beginning of the number as a whole or the most recent "pi'e" (whichsoever was more recently uttered). It is to be followed by a sumti (or multiple sumti strung together by connectives) and has its scope of specification terminate with that sumti; in this regard, it works syntactically and semantically exactly like ju'au. In fact, ju'au can be used outside of the number in order to specify the macrodigit interpretation instead of this word (for example, if its sumti were la .tsonais., this word would not be needed); however, if only a sequence were to have been given as the argument of ju'au (such as the factorial sequence) and if some base other than decimal were desired for the interpretation of each macrodigit from the string of microdigits, then this word would be used. If only one macrodigit appears in the number, then this word is equivalent to ju'au. In short, the scope of this word is one contiguous string of microdigits, and it influences their interpretation into a macrodigit value in the same way that ju'au does. However, if both ju'au and this word specify how to interpret a given string of microdigits in the same number (composed of macrodigits), this word overrides the interpretation specified by ju'au (but only for this macrodigit); thus, for example, a Tsohnai number can have each of its macrodigits be interpreted in balanced quinary except one, which the speaker specifies via this word, because they know the value but did not want to convert it to balanced quinary (because it may be too large or hard to do so easily), so they instead expressed it in decimal.