lojbo jufsisku
Lojban sentence search

Total: 247 result(s)
te'au
experimental cmavo iterated Cartesian product with self: A × A × ... × A, n times. Probably belongs to selma'o VUhU but, since it is iterated JOI, there is the case for that. First argument A is a set or similar object; second argument n is a nonnegative integer; the result is the cross-product of A with itself n times. Used as a shortcut for longer, arguably more preferable, constructions so that one can more closely say "R three" and mean R^3. Emphatically not equivalent to exponentiation; it only works on sets and similar objects. See also: te'a, pi'u, se'au.
xanri
gismu rafsi: xar x1 [concept] exists in the imagination of/is imagined by/is imaginary to x2. Also (adjective:) x1 is mental (one sense), x1 is unreal (one sense); in spite of the synonym, note that x1 is imaginary does not imply that it doesn't exist in the real world; the definition is crafted so that one can talk about imaginary things without claiming that they thereby don't exist. See also fatci, senva, sucta, zasti, cfika, dacti, menli, sidbo.
zilkacmre
lujvo x1 = m2 [quantity] is x2 = k3 = m3 [number counted] items/units of/in/pertaining to set x3 = k2, on scale x4 = m4 (si'o; default: from 0 representing nothing/no instances of the item, and by (units of) 1 for each additional occurrence if the item is quantized). x1 is countably measurable. Counting should (ideally) be perfect, so accuracy is identically and mathematically equal to "1"; the scale sets the "counting [off] by units" and most countable things are counted from "0" (meaning nothing/no instances of the item in question) with each additional occurrence of the (quantized) item being represented by an addition "1". See: kamre, kacmre.
de'oi
experimental cmavo Cancellation (instant-/usage-wise; temporary) of all defaults in immediately previous word Cancels/overrides/ignores/"kills" all defaults (default specifications) in the (terbri) structure of immediately previously uttered word so that implicit/omitted zo'e and{di’au} that may fill the terbri of that word are general in potential reference (modulo context) and do not necessarily agree with the default setting explicitly specified in the discourse-external/“official” definition of the word. The terbri are not filled by this word. Usage is only meaningful for a brivla with at least one terbri (regardless of being explicitly filled or otherwise). In a tanru or other complicated construct, only the most recent word undergoes this terbri default override (not every term in the construct). A selbri converted to a sumti by gadri has the x1 terbri filled for the purposes of this word, but the default setting of that terbri is so overridden all the same; likewise is the case for terbri accessed by be or bei; seltau in the main level of a sumti are filled by the gadri as well for the purposes of this word. The cancellation is only effective for the single occurrence/instant/usage of this word (the next use of the affected word will be implicitly accompanied by its terbri defaults, as defined elsewhere (by official definition or by other (permanent) modifications made to the word)). See also: doi'a, de'au, zmico.
doi'a
experimental cmavo gafyzmico: Reset all default specification of the immediately previous word to their respective discourse-external/official definition specifications for this instance/usage only. Resets all defaults (default specifications) in the (terbri) structure of immediately previously uttered word so that implicit/omitted zo'e and di'au that may fill the terbri of that word are predefined/specific in reference and do indeed necessarily agree with the default setting explicitly specified in the discourse-exterior/”official” definition of the word. The terbri are not filled by this word. Usage is only meaningful for a brivla with at least one terbri (regardless of being explicitly filled or otherwise). In a tanru or other complicated construct, only the most recent word undergoes this terbri default restoration (not every term in the construct). A selbri converted to a sumti by gadri has the x1 terbri filled for the purposes of this word, but the default setting of that terbri is so restored all the same; likewise is the case for terbri accessed by be or bei; seltau in the main level of a sumti are filled by the gadri as well for the purposes of this word. The restoration is only effective for the single occurrence/instant/usage of this word (the next use of the affected word will be implicitly accompanied by its terbri defaults, as defined elsewhere (by official definition or by other (permanent) modifications made to the word)). See also: dau'a, de'oi, zmico
tcanaba
fu'ivla x1 (node/vertex/station) is forward of/along from x2 in oriented graph x3 (graph with orientation) using oriented edge path x4 (ordered sequence of ordered pairs). The path from x2 to x1 runs along/is coparallel with/downstream of the orientation on x3 along path x4. Orientation is given from/by x3, so only an edge need be submitted if x3 is fully specified; if x3 is not fully specified, x4 can take the burden of specifying the orientation and subgraph of particular interest (namely, the two vertices x1 and x2, intervening vertices along the path, and the orientation of the given edges connecting them). Note that on an unoriented edge or along a cycle, x1 and x2 might be able to exchange places and/or be equal one another. x4 is an ordered sequence of ordered pairs; the first entry of each pair is the origin node, the second pair is the destination node; the path should probably be connected (so that the destination node of one pair is the origin node of the next, except possibly if it is the last such pair). x1 is not necessarily next (id est: forward adjacent of/from) x2, but it can be. Useful for pages, webpages, family relationships, utterances, etc. See also: grafu, tcanaca, tcanapu.
tcanapu
fu'ivla x1 (node/vertex/station) is backward of/along from x2 in oriented graph x3 (graph with orientation) using oriented edge path x4 (ordered sequence of ordered pairs; oriented edges). The path from x2 to x1 along the (now-unoriented version of the) edges used in x4 is counter/against/upstream of the orientation of x3 (and/or given by the oriented version of x4). Orientation is given from/by x3, so only an edge need be submitted if x3 is fully specified; if x3 is not fully specified, x4 can take the burden of specifying the orientation and subgraph of particular interest (namely, the two vertices x1 and x2, intervening vertices along the path, and the orientation of the given edges connecting them). Note that on an unoriented edge or along a cycle, x1 and x2 might be able to exchange places and/or be equal one another. x4 is an ordered sequence of ordered pairs; the first entry of each pair is the origin node, the second pair is the destination node; the path should probably be connected (so that the destination node of one pair is the origin node of the next, except possibly if it is the last such pair). x1 is not necessarily last (id est: backward adjacent of/from) x2, but it can be. Useful for pages, webpages, family relationships, utterances, etc. See also: grafu, tcanaba, tcanaca
cu'au
experimental cmavo universial famyma'o: terminates the most recently opened construct or clause. cu'au looks back for the most recently opened construct that has not been terminated, and emulates whatever famyma'o would terminate it. It can also be subscripted with xi, and will terminate that many times. Note that that means grammatical function is being put in a xi clause, so be careful when using it. Additionally, cu'au xi ro will terminate all the way up to the last sentence-starting word (.i mi klama lo zarci pe lo pendo be mi cu'au xi ro -> .i mi klama lo zarci pe lo pendo be mi cu'au-be'o-ku-ge'u-ku-vau). This will also terminate to sentences started in lu (will NOT emulate li'u UNLESS used multiple times), ni'o, and no'i. It will NOT emulate le'u. In addition to ro, it can be subscripted with da'a, which terminates to the sentence level, minus 1. In the previous example, this would just leave the vau remaining, and allow you to continue to add to the place structure of klama.
dinso
experimental gismu x1 is a dinosaur [very general: any ancient quasi-reptilian vertebrate] of type x2 living in era x3. A gismu version of dinsauru; contrast with reksa. The use of this word is not strictly only relevant to members of clade Dinosauria, although it does include them (and, specifically, birds); its referent might include pterosaurs, icthyosaurs, plesiosaurs, mosasaurs, dimetrodons, avemetatarsaliads, and perhaps even synapsids (in other words, any ancient quasi-reptilian vertebrate). As such, it is a qualitative word that bears no particular or strong attention or respect to genealogy or academic classification of these animals. Basically, any ancient animal the name of which ends in "-saur" can be so-described. Proposed short rafsi: -dis-. See also: rexsa, ketslau, ikfiio, disrmuzo, plesiio.
javniso
fu'ivla x1 is the ISO designation/result/standard/code for topic x2 applied to specific case/individual/group/thing x3 according to rule/ISO specification x4 published by/according to mandating organization x5 (default: ISO) Theoretically, the standard organization/body could be other than ISO, but it should be prominent and/or international (and internationally recognized) in scope and nature; in such a case, replace each occurrence of "ISO" in the definition with the appropriate name/designation/title (of the organization, etc.). x1 need not be a name-designation/code (it could be the result of any rule), although it likely will commonly be so. Examples of possible x2-filling sumti: code-designations for language, country, currency, etc.. For an entity with a given code, use {te javniso} or {te se javniso} (specifying the type of entity being designated by use of the appropriate terbri j2); for a given ISO rule, consider {ve javniso}; for the organization ISO, consider {xe javniso}. See also: linga, landa, rucni, jvinjiata, jvinjica'o. This word is the fu'ivla version of: jviso; equivalent to jvaiso (for slightly abbreviated form that preserves some pronunciations of "ISO").
jvaiso
fu'ivla x1 is the ISO designation/result/standard/code for topic x2 applied to specific case/individual/group/thing x3 according to rule/ISO specification x4 published by/according to mandating organization x5 (default: ISO) Theoretically, the standard organization/body could be other than ISO, but it should be prominent and/or international (and internationally recognized) in scope and nature; in such a case, replace each occurrence of "ISO" in the definition with the appropriate name/designation/title (of the organization, etc.). x1 need not be a name-designation/code (it could be the result of any rule), although it likely will commonly be so. Examples of possible x2-filling sumti: code-designations for language, country, currency, etc.. For an entity with a given code, use {te jvaiso} or {te se jvaiso} (specifying the type of entity being designated by use of the appropriate terbri j2); for a given ISO rule, consider {ve jvaiso}; for the organization ISO, consider {xe jvaiso}. See also: linga, landa, rucni, jvinjiata, jvinjica'o. This word is the fu'ivla version of: jviso; equivalent to javniso.
jvinjiata
obsolete fu'ivla x1 is the IATA (International Air Transport Association) designation/result/standard/code for general subject type x2 (contextless default probably: airports) applied to specific case/entity/procedure/group/hub/terminus/location x3 according to rule/IATA specification/publication x4 published by/according to mandating organization x5 (default: IATA) x1 need not be a name-designation/code (it could be the result of any rule), although it likely will commonly be so. Possible examples of x2-filling sumti include: the code designated to name certain (international) airports, codeshared railway stations, and separate Amtrak (railway) stations, etc.. x3 is probably outlined by IATA Resolution 763, but the exact publication of the IATA Airline Coding Directory could also be specified. For an airport (generalized)/hub that has such a specification, use {te jvinjiata} or {te se jvinjiata} (using the appropriate terbri for specifying the type of hub: tebri j2); for IATA, consider using {xe jvinjiata}. See also: jviso, jvinjica'o.
terpanryziltolju'i
lujvo x1=j2=p3 (ka; jo'u/fa'u term) is the minor difference in/between x2=p2 and x3=p1 that is to be ignored, their similarity being by standard/in geometry x4; x2 is the same as/similar to/parallels x3 in standard/geometry x4 up to/modulo/except for/ignoring unimportant difference x1; x1 is not the focus of the main consideration concerning the similarity between x2 and x3; x2 belongs to/is an element of the same equivalence class as x3, which depends on x4 in some way and which ignores the property x1. For example, tetrominoes "L" and "7" are similar up to the unimportant property of 90-degree rotation; thus: loka carna keiku ly terpanryziltolju'i zebu loka mapti. x2 and x3 are symmetric; while with panra, x1 (which is x3 in terpanryziltolju'i) is possibly of importance/focus/attention, for terpanryziltolju'i, x2 is. Additionally, lo panra and lo se panra are identical, therefore conversion under te does not affect the x2 and x3 positions of panra, so the overall structure does not need to have undergone an additional conversion. See: panra, klesi, panrykle, panryzilbri
zoi'ai
experimental cmavo non-mekso quote/name substitution for ordered collection of prescriptions, descriptions, definitions, etc. Delimited non-math/non-mekso quote (works like zoi in this respect). Treats the quote as a substitute for some formal collection of rules or mathematical description/definitions/notations; the exact meaning of the quote must be inferred as is the case with la or any quote; the quote is treated as a single block of text representative a single entity so described in only that case/context by the utterer; can be used to clarify the interpretation of text (convention specification; text need not be mathematical (in which case, it must be used in a meta-linguistic scope)) or as an operand of certain mathematical operators (or, more generally perhaps, bridi). Might be useful for quoting names as descriptors for arguments of operands. For example: orderings, metrics, bases, densities, analytic properties, conventions, etc. can all be more easily described by a moniker than by a formal mathematical description. See also: ju'au, se'au, mau'au.
ju'au
experimental cmavo semi-mathematical binary operator: named number base operator/interpreter Follows a number and is followed by a sumti string (introduced with appropriate gadri, multiple sumti strung together via connectives); scope terminates with the end of the sumti and/or with ke'e'au. The construct as a whole syntactically functions as a parenthetical so that mekso may be resumed immediately thereafter without any difficulty. This word attaches to/affects the immediately preceding macrodigit string extending from the last evaluated number, number operation, etc. or bracket to/until this word. The preceding number is semantically interpreted according to the description to which the following sumti refers. If a sequence is supplied as the following sumti, the preceding number is interpreted so that each digit, starting from the left (default: see next), is understood as a multiple of the corresponding value in the sequence under the ordering given (which may produce an invalid/ill-formed result; the placement of pi matters as well). If a single number is submitted (such as "li dau"), this word acts as ju'u; the number is interpreted according to the rules of mekso and is its own island for such interpretation (thus ju'u is needed to override a cultural/grammatical default interpretation, such as decimal, even if this is done within the mekso expression outside of and including the scope of this word). In this way, the sumti being (10^n)_n, which is a sequence, is the same as the sumti being just 10, but is very different from it being the sequence (10)_n. The original default for numeral-position/string reading/interpretation is from left-to-right, where a digit on the left in a pair of digits represents that multiple of a "later" term in the sequence as compared to right member of the pair; thus "23" in decimal means (2*(10^1)) + (3*(10^0)), which is twenty-three. This default may be overridden via specification of the sequence (either its ordering, its domain being negated, or alteration to the base); alternatively, and perhaps more easily, the appearance of "la'e zoi jbo. ri'u bi'o zu'a .jbo" will always reverse it (this is a special input value with interpretation defined by this grammar); when reversed, "23" in decimal means (2*(10^0)) + (3*(10^1)), which is to say thirty-two. Generally, this word overrides the default interpretation of a string of microdigits when computing the value of a macrodigit (see: ju'u'i). See also: ju'u, ju'u'i, pi'e.
ju'u'i
experimental cmavo long-digit interpretation specifier; macrodigit named base specifier When a string of multiple digits is on either side of pi'e, the string is to be interpreted as a single "macrodigit" in the longer numeric string; let the digits that compose it be called "microdigits" for clarity. By default, the macrodigit is interpreted as being written/expressed in some cultural or grammatical default (this default is overridden by ju'au if its specifying sumti requires an alternative interpretation for the value of the macrodigits), probably decimal- the interpretation of the string of microdigits produces a number, x; the "pi'e" implies the denominator to be used in determining the fraction for which x is in the numerator and context or possibly a specified base determines its value- in timekeeping, the interpretation is typically x/60 for certain macrodigits. However, the default for determining the value of x given a string of microdigits might be useful to override (for example, Tsohnai uses an overall factorial base but each macrodigit is written in balanced quinary); this word specifies the base used for interpreting the macrodigit from a string of microdigits. It is placed at the end of the string (possibly before the next "pi'e") and its scope of effect extends from there, through the string of microdigits, to either the beginning of the number as a whole or the most recent "pi'e" (whichsoever was more recently uttered). It is to be followed by a sumti (or multiple sumti strung together by connectives) and has its scope of specification terminate with that sumti; in this regard, it works syntactically and semantically exactly like ju'au. In fact, ju'au can be used outside of the number in order to specify the macrodigit interpretation instead of this word (for example, if its sumti were la .tsonais., this word would not be needed); however, if only a sequence were to have been given as the argument of ju'au (such as the factorial sequence) and if some base other than decimal were desired for the interpretation of each macrodigit from the string of microdigits, then this word would be used. If only one macrodigit appears in the number, then this word is equivalent to ju'au. In short, the scope of this word is one contiguous string of microdigits, and it influences their interpretation into a macrodigit value in the same way that ju'au does. However, if both ju'au and this word specify how to interpret a given string of microdigits in the same number (composed of macrodigits), this word overrides the interpretation specified by ju'au (but only for this macrodigit); thus, for example, a Tsohnai number can have each of its macrodigits be interpreted in balanced quinary except one, which the speaker specifies via this word, because they know the value but did not want to convert it to balanced quinary (because it may be too large or hard to do so easily), so they instead expressed it in decimal.