lojbo jufsisku
Lojban sentence search

Total: 46 result(s)
di'oi
experimental cmavo pro-sumti & sumyzmico: discourse-exterior default it Explicitly and emphatically references the specified default value of the relevant terbri as given by "official" definitions (exterior to the discourse); this value ignores and is independent of any modifications made to the relevant default specification during the discourse. (zo'e, implicit or explicit, may do so as well, but the use of this word implies some degree of a more deliberate choice to follow the discourse-exterior default specification.) When a default is not specified by the definition of a word, this word is equivalent to completely general and elliptical zo'e. See also: di'au, di'ei, zmico.
gafyzmico
lujvo x1=z1=g1 is a zmico that modifies the terbri default specification of a brivla, producing result x2=z2=g3 at level/with construct-orientation x3=z3 with discourse duration x4=z4 in language x5=z5; x1 is a default specification modifier that produces output re-specification x2 zmico is an experimental gismu. See also: zmico, sumyzmico
jvinjica'o
fu'ivla x1 is the ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization; French: Organisation de l'aviation civile internationale, OACI) designation/result/standard/code for general subject type x2 (contextless default probably: airports) applied to specific case/entity/procedure/group/hub/terminus/location x3 according to rule/ICAO specification/publication x4 published by/according to mandating organization x5 (default: ICAO) x1 need not be a name-designation/code (it could be the result of any rule), although it likely will commonly be so. Possible examples of x2-filling sumti include: certain (international) airport code designations, air navigation procedures, etc.. For an airport (generalized)/hub that has such a specification, use {te jvinjica'o} or {te se jvinjica'o} (using the appropriate terbri for specifying the type of hub: tebri j2); for ICAO, consider using {xe jvinjica'o}. See also: jviso, jvinjiata.
jvocme
lujvo c1 (quoted word(s)) is a name of c2 used by c3 that morphologically [strict] is a Lojbanic lujvo built from predicates metaphor/tanru l4 The morphology is according to Lojban grammar rules; as such, the word(s) c1 must end with vowels and in fact must exactly follow the morphology of brivla (and, moreover, lujvo; else, they would not be morphologically correct lujvo). l1 is essentially c1 modulo meaning and exact syntactic operation. The other terbri of lujvo (namely, l2 and l3) are not useful for names. See also: jvosmicme for a slight generalization, brivlasmicme for a greater generalization thereof.
pavysmi
lujvo x1 is the one(-like) element/multiplicative identity of structure/ring x2; often is denoted by ' 1_R ' or ' I_R ' or by (when context is obvious) '1' or 'I', for structure/ring R (given by x2). Definition and rules may be specified in the second terbri; this definition does not suppose that the ring is not the 0-ring (the trivial ring) with the mapping of all multiplications to 0 (in which case, the additive identity is also the multiplicative identity). The usage of "additive" and "multiplicative" in this context are defined by the ring. The n×n identity matrix over a given ring is an example of one such element. See also: nonsmi
sumyzmico
lujvo x1=z1=s1 is a zmico that functions as a pro-sumti which references specified default value x2=z2 (definition/function) that works with discourse-orientation x3=z3 (discourse exterior/interior), filling terbri of brivla/predicate x4=s2, in language x5=z5; x1 is a default-value-referencing pro-sumti with definition/function/value x2 zmico is an experimental gismu. See also: zmico, zicysu'i, gafyzmico.
pletomino
fu'ivla x1 is a polyform/polyplet/polyomino/polyabolo/polyiamond (etc.) composed of parts/'tile' polytope x2 arranged in (finite) unified shape/pattern x3 in ambient space x4 and subject to rules/restrictions/conditions x5 The number arrangement and rules may be as generic/vague as desired. The number of polytope 'tiles' used can be specified in the third of fifth terbri as desired; the polytopes used need not all be the same, nor regular, so long as the arrangement is meaningful and possible. One of the main differences between rectangular polyplets and polyominoes is that polyominoes cannot have their polytope tiles touching only at their vertices whereas polyplets can (thus, polyominoes are a subset of the rectangular polyplets); this difference can be specified in the final terbri. A tiling of a space may be considered to be an infinite polyform, but that is rather pathological and we can reasonably assume that polyforms referenced by this word will be finite. The polyform is considered to be a unified whole entity. The ambient space is usually going to be the Euclidean space of the same dimension as the polytopes (and the former dimension cannot be exceeded by the latter except in the marginal case of lower-dimensional (id est: hyperplanar) arrangements, in which case parallel cross-sections are really being considered); this space determines the rigid-motion/symmetry isomorphisms of various polyforms (Z and S tetraminoes are non-isomorphic under rigid-motion in the Euclidean plane but are so isomorphic in Euclidean 3-space). The ambient space also determines the expression of (and indeed the 'allowed') polytopes: spherical geometry allows for digons to be arranged so as to form a polyform, but Euclidean 2-space prohibits such objects from the set of possible polygons. The default polytope will probably be a 2-dimensional square; thus the default ambient space will likely be Euclidean 2-space. See also: karda, korfaipletomino
se'u'o
experimental cmavo selbri conversion question Asks for the SE word that is intended (or at least makes the sentence true). Subscript a set of numbers that represent the order of terbri in question; the subscripted set can be a set of ordered or unordered tuples, specifying exactly which terbri may be exchanged. 'la .ralf. se'u'o xi li re ce li ci pi'u li re cebo li ci klama by boi cy' = 'Did Ralph come to B from C or to C from B?' (notably, 'Did B come to Ralph from C?' is not a possible option for answering the question). An answer is a SE string that is allowed by the selbri and by the subscripts; continuing the example, if the response is 'Ralph went to C from B', one would respond with '.i setese'. Any SE word works for the general question possibility (which is the unrestricted/non-subscripted case). Essentially 'se'u'o xi sy' is equivalent to 'se xi li xo poi ke'a cmima sy' (where 'te' is basically understood as ' se xi li jo'i pa boi ci te'u ', etc.), but the answer can be a complicated ordered sequence/string of SE words; this word complements specifically fi'a in the typical/same way that SE complements FA. Typically, leaving the subscripted set vague or not completely free of every possible semantic or syntactic pathology is perfectly fine; syntax and practicality will typically restrict it enough for reasonable responses to be made. See also: re'au'e (which alone would be used in answering that 'Ralph goes to B from C' in the previous question).
brivlasmicme
lujvo c1=s1 (quoted word(s)) is a name of c2 used by c3 that morphologically [loose] evokes/is similar to/is a brivla bv1=s2 (text; may be multiple words), similar in property/quality[/amount?] s3 (ka/ni), in language x6 s3 will likely just be morphological structure. Strict brivlacme are a subclass of brivlasmicme. The name must "look like" a (sequence of) brivla (according to rules for language x6), but need not exactly follow the morphological requirements thereof (in particular, c1 may end with a consonant in Lojban). See also: brivlacme (a specialization); jvosmicme (a different specialization that is analogous but restricted to Lojbanic lujvo). Language is specified to be x6 rather than bv_n because the definition for brivla has not yet gained consensus and this particular terbri is dependent thereupon.
javniso
fu'ivla x1 is the ISO designation/result/standard/code for topic x2 applied to specific case/individual/group/thing x3 according to rule/ISO specification x4 published by/according to mandating organization x5 (default: ISO) Theoretically, the standard organization/body could be other than ISO, but it should be prominent and/or international (and internationally recognized) in scope and nature; in such a case, replace each occurrence of "ISO" in the definition with the appropriate name/designation/title (of the organization, etc.). x1 need not be a name-designation/code (it could be the result of any rule), although it likely will commonly be so. Examples of possible x2-filling sumti: code-designations for language, country, currency, etc.. For an entity with a given code, use {te javniso} or {te se javniso} (specifying the type of entity being designated by use of the appropriate terbri j2); for a given ISO rule, consider {ve javniso}; for the organization ISO, consider {xe javniso}. See also: linga, landa, rucni, jvinjiata, jvinjica'o. This word is the fu'ivla version of: jviso; equivalent to jvaiso (for slightly abbreviated form that preserves some pronunciations of "ISO").
jvaiso
fu'ivla x1 is the ISO designation/result/standard/code for topic x2 applied to specific case/individual/group/thing x3 according to rule/ISO specification x4 published by/according to mandating organization x5 (default: ISO) Theoretically, the standard organization/body could be other than ISO, but it should be prominent and/or international (and internationally recognized) in scope and nature; in such a case, replace each occurrence of "ISO" in the definition with the appropriate name/designation/title (of the organization, etc.). x1 need not be a name-designation/code (it could be the result of any rule), although it likely will commonly be so. Examples of possible x2-filling sumti: code-designations for language, country, currency, etc.. For an entity with a given code, use {te jvaiso} or {te se jvaiso} (specifying the type of entity being designated by use of the appropriate terbri j2); for a given ISO rule, consider {ve jvaiso}; for the organization ISO, consider {xe jvaiso}. See also: linga, landa, rucni, jvinjiata, jvinjica'o. This word is the fu'ivla version of: jviso; equivalent to javniso.
jvinjiata
obsolete fu'ivla x1 is the IATA (International Air Transport Association) designation/result/standard/code for general subject type x2 (contextless default probably: airports) applied to specific case/entity/procedure/group/hub/terminus/location x3 according to rule/IATA specification/publication x4 published by/according to mandating organization x5 (default: IATA) x1 need not be a name-designation/code (it could be the result of any rule), although it likely will commonly be so. Possible examples of x2-filling sumti include: the code designated to name certain (international) airports, codeshared railway stations, and separate Amtrak (railway) stations, etc.. x3 is probably outlined by IATA Resolution 763, but the exact publication of the IATA Airline Coding Directory could also be specified. For an airport (generalized)/hub that has such a specification, use {te jvinjiata} or {te se jvinjiata} (using the appropriate terbri for specifying the type of hub: tebri j2); for IATA, consider using {xe jvinjiata}. See also: jviso, jvinjica'o.
jviso
experimental gismu x1 is the ISO designation/result/standard/code for topic x2 applied to specific case/individual/group/thing x3 according to rule/ISO specification x4 published by/according to mandating organization x5 (default: ISO) Theoretically, the standard organization/body could be other than ISO, but it should be prominent and/or international (and internationally recognized) in scope and nature; in such a case, replace each occurrence of "ISO" in the definition with the appropriate name/designation/title (of the organization, etc.). x1 need not be a name-designation/code (it could be the result of any rule), although it likely will commonly be so. Examples of possible x2-filling sumti: code-designations for language, country, currency, script, etc.. For an entity with a given code, use terjviso or terseljviso (specifying the type of entity being designated by use of the appropriate terbri j2); for a given ISO rule, consider veljviso; for the organization ISO, consider xeljviso. See also: linga, landa, rucni, cilfu, jvinjiata/jvisiata, jvinjica'o/jvisica'o, jvisuai, jvisiupaco, jvisrcei, jvisrbipmo. This word is the gismu version of: javniso/jvaiso.
aigne
fu'ivla x1 is an eigenvalue (or zero) of linear transformation/square matrix x2, associated with/'owning' all vectors in generalized eigenspace x3 (implies neither nondegeneracy nor degeneracy; default includes the zero vector) with 'eigenspace-generalization' power/exponent x4 (typically and probably by cultural default will be 1), with algebraic multiplicity (of eigenvalue) x5 For any eigenvector v in generalized eigenspace x3 of linear transformation x2 for eigenvalue x1, where I is the identity matrix/transformation that works/makes sense in the context, the following equation is satisfied: ((x2 - x1 I)^x4)v = 0. When the argument of x4 is 1, the generalized eigenspace x3 is simply a strict/simple/basic eigenspace; this is the typical (and probable cultural default) meaning of this word. x4 will typically be restricted to integer values k > 0. x2 should always be specified (at least implicitly by context), for an eigenvalue does not mean much without the linear transformation being known. However, since one usually knows the said linear transformation, and since the basic underlying relationship of this word is "eigen-ness", the eigenvalue is given the primary terbri (x1). When filling x3 and/or x4, x2 and x1 (in that order of importance) should already be (at least contextually implicitly) specified. x3 is the set of all eigenvectors of linear transformation x2, endowed with all of the typical operations of the vector space at hand. The default includes the zero vector (else the x3 eigenspace is not actually a vector space); normally in the context of mathematics, the zero vector is not considered to be an eigenvector, but by this definition it is included. Thus, a Lojban mathematician would consider the zero vector to be an (automatic) eigenvector of the given (in fact, any) linear transformation (particularly ones represented by a square matrix in a given basis). This is the logically most basic definition, but is contrary to typical mathematical culture. This word implies neither nondegeneracy nor degeneracy of eigenspace x3. In other words there may or may not be more than one linearly independent vector in the eigenspace x3 for a given eigenvalue x1 of linear transformation x2. x3 is the unique generalized eigenspace of x2 for given values of x1 and x4. x1 is not necessarily the unique eigenvalue of linear transformation x2, nor is its multiplicity necessarily 1 for the same. Beware when converting the terbri structure of this word. In fact, the set of all eigenvalues for a given linear transformation x2 will include scalar zero (0); therefore, any linear transformation with a nontrivial set of eigenvalues will have at least two eigenvalues that may fill in terbri x1 of this word. The 'eigenvalue' of zero for a proper/nice linear transformation will produce an 'eigenspace' that is equivalent to the entire vector space at hand. If x3 is specified by a set of vectors, the span of that set should fully yield the entire eigenspace of the linear transformation x2 associated with eigenvalue x1, however the set may be redundant (linearly dependent); the zero vector is automatically included in any vector space. A multidimensional eigenspace (that is to say a vector space of eigenvectors with dimension strictly greater than 1) for fixed eigenvalue and linear transformation (and generalization exponent) is degenerate by definition. The algebraic multiplicity x5 of the eigenvalue does not entail degeneracy (of eigenspace) if greater than 1; it is the integer number of occurrences of a given eigenvalue x1 in the multiset of eigenvalues (spectrum) of the given linear transformation/square matrix x2. In other words, the characteristic polynomial can be factored into linear polynomial primes (with root x1) which are exponentiated to the power x5 (the multiplicity; notably, not x4). For x4 > x5, the eigenspace is trivial. x2 may not be diagonalizable. The scalar zero (0) is a naturally permissible argument of x1 (unlike some cultural mathematical definitions in English). Eigenspaces retain the operations and properties endowing the vectorspaces to which they belong (as subspaces). Thus, an eigenspace is more than a set of objects: it is a set of vectors such that that set is endowed with vectorspace operators and properties. Thus klesi alone is insufficient. But the set underlying eigenspace x3 is a type of klesi, with the property of being closed under linear transformation x2 (up to scalar multiplication). The vector space and basis being used are not specified by this word. Use this word as a seltau in constructions such as "eigenket", "eigenstate", etc. (In such cases, te aigne is recommended for the typical English usages of such terms. Use zei in lujvo formed by these constructs. The term "eigenvector" may be rendered as cmima be le te aigne). See also gei'ai, klesi, daigno