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Lojban sentence search

Total: 45 result(s)
terdzu
lujvo x3=c1 walks/strides/paces on surface x2=c2 using limbs x1=c3. te cadzu; see also tuple
zaglamtu'e
lujvo t1 is the thigh of t2=z2. The thigh is the area between the pelvis and the knee. Anatomically, it is part of the lower limb. Cf. tuple.
jamfu
gismu rafsi: jaf jma x1 is a/the foot [body-part] of x2; [metaphor: lowest portion] (adjective:) x1 is pedal. See also jicmu, genja, zbepi, tuple, jubme, xance, tamji.
tsetupyzbe
lujvo t1=zb1 is a lap [body part] of t2=zu1 supporting zb2. Cf. tuple, zutse, zbepi, galtupcra. A lap only exists in a seated form, and not when a being is standing erect or when it is lying down.
fa'au
experimental cmavo mathematical unary operator: map notation Input is unary: a function f; the output is an ordered tuple: (the domain set of f, the codomain set of f, the image of f, the mapping rule of f (defined with a dummy variable which is taken to belong to the the domain set of f), the graph/plot (set of input-output pairs) of f). Might be useful for lambda calculus, etc. Equip the output with ma'o in order to use as a/the function. Extract a term in the tuple in order to use it directly.
zbepi
gismu rafsi: zbe x1 is a pedestal/base/stand/pallet supporting x2 (object/event), of materials/properties x3. Pallet (= lafyzbe). See also jamfu, jicmu, jubme, tuple, ckana, cpana, loldi, sanli.
to'ei'au
experimental cmavo binary mathematical operator: Jordan totient function J_a(b) Produces the number of a-tuples of strictly positive integers all less than or equal to b that form a coprime (a+1)-tuple together with b. J_1=Phi where Phi is the Euler totient function.
sanli
gismu rafsi: sa'i x1 stands [is vertically oriented] on surface x2 supported by limbs/support/pedestal x3. x1 is standing; x1 stands up; x1 is erect/vertical/upright; x1 bows/bends over (= krosa'i, krosa'ibi'o, plosa'i); frame of reference is (approximate) perpendicularity to the surface, and not to a gravity field. See also kamju, sraji, tuple, zbepi, sarji.
grafetu
fu'ivla x1 is the graph on vertices/nodes x2 (set) and edges x3 (set of ordered tuples of vertices in x2) and with additional properties x4. A "web"/"network". An element of x2 is a "place" in a more generic/abstract/metaphoric sense than spatial; must be discrete. Thus, webpages, family diagrams, lattices, pages in a book, cities and roadways on a map, etc. constitute graphs. x1 also includes trees. Notice that both x2 and x3 are sets; an element of x3 is an ordered pair/2-tuple, but the order does not matter unless x1 is oriented, in which case the edge runs from the first node in the tuple to the second node in the tuple. x4 can include defining features, weights, etc. Equivalent to grafu (which is merely the gismu form of this word); very similar to tcana.
bai'i
experimental cmavo mekso string operator (ternary): find-and-replace; in string/text/word/sequence X1 formally replace X2 (ordered tuple of terms to be replaced) with X3 (ordered tuple of terms to be respectively substituted) X2 and X3 are ordered tuples of substrings/letters/characters/letterals/digits/numerals. The ith term in tuple X2 is replaced with the ith term in tuple X3; the replacements are executed simultaneously (thus, no overlap/contradiction can be allowed to arise in the substitution- in particular, in X2) - alternatively, if there is overlap/conflict in/between the terms of X2, the replacements are performed in order of presentation (the ith term in X2 is replaced by the ith term in X3, and then the (i+1)th term in X2 is replaced with the (i+1)th term in X3, starting with the 1st term in each). X2 and X3 must have the same length/number of terms - alternatively, X3 cannot be longer/have more terms than X2; in this situation, the ith term of X2 is replaced with the ith term of X3 until and including when the last term of X3 is reached, after which point the remaining terms in X2 are not replaced at all. Use a permutation acting on X2 as the argument for X3 in order to rearrange the substrings of X1; if the alphabet is ordered, then operators can be applied to the letters in order to rotate through the alphabet. In particular, if X1 is a binary string (a word over an alphabet of two letters) and X2 is the 2-tuple of the letters of that binary alphabet (length-1 substrings), then without specification of X3, this operator defaults to bitwise binary negation (bit conjugation) wherein each letter in X1 is replaced by the unique other letter in the binary alphabet (otherwise, the replacement would be the identity/trivial replacement or just a formal substitution letter-by-letter which does not really change the nature of the word). X1 and each entry in X2 and X3 should be quoted, match a necessary type (such as being a character), or be abstracted a level by symbolics. In general, the replacement is formal and the strings in X3 need not be over the same alphabet as the one over which X1 is written. This operator is useful for combinatorial lines and for expanding digits (such as, in a binary string, replacing each occurrence of "0" with "01" and each occurrence of "1" with "10"; note that the replacement is instantaneous and simultaneous for all terms of X2 and every occurrence of such terms in X1, thus this substitution is perfectly acceptable).
fa'ai
experimental cmavo mathematical ordered n-ary operator: (pointwise) functional left composition; ° Inputs must be appropriate functions; outputs a function; follow by boi in order to include arguments (producing a number). a1 ° a2 °…° a_n = a1(a2(…(a_n(•))…)). Replaces all of the inputs with a (possibly stripped, as appropriate) tuple; for replacing a single argument in a multivariate function with a function (either evaluated or not), use (partial) (e)valuation.
jau'au
experimental cmavo unary mathematical operator: length/number of components/terms of/in object/array/formal string/sequence/word/text in some alphabet/base/basis which includes each digit; number of digits/components/entries For a numerical string, the number of digits are counted. For a tuple/vector/array/matrix/tensor, the number of entries/conponents is counted. Not literally the number of symbols used, but the number of meaningful "spots" occupied; for example "(1,0)" uses five characters, but its length is just 2 (for "1" and then "0"); this is due to the fact that formal representation may vary but the amount of information conveyed must remain constant. Note that digit strings are essentially considered to be vectors in the basis of powers of the base.
mei
cmavo rafsi: mem mei convert number to cardinality selbri; x1 is the mass formed from set x2 whose n member(s) are x3. [x1 is a mass with N components x3 composing set x2; x2 is an n-tuple (x2 is completely specified) (= selmei for reordered places); x1 forms an n-some; x3 (not necessarily a complete enumeration) are among the members of x2]; See also cmima, gunma, cmavo list moi.